Christ Books
Bringing resources to know the person of Jesus Christ.

Books by Charles Spurgeon

Monday, January 25, 2010



Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-92) was England's best-known preacher for most of the second half of the nineteenth century. In 1854, just four years after his conversion, Spurgeon, then only 20, became pastor of London's famed New Park Street Church (formerly pastored by the famous Baptist theologian John Gill). The congregation quickly outgrew their building, moved to Exeter Hall, then to Surrey Music Hall. In these venues Spurgeon frequently preached to audiences numbering more than 10,000—all in the days before electronic amplification. In 1861 the congregation moved permanently to the newly constructed Metropolitan Tabernacle.


Spurgeon's printed works are voluminous, and those provided here are only a sampling of his best-known works, including his magnum opus, The Treasury of David.

Back to God's Spurgeons.
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Books by Dr E W Kenyon

Monday, January 25, 2010

Essek William Kenyon (1867-1948) was considered one of the all-time greatest of God's teachers of the 19th and 20th century. He did more to teach and spread the truth of Christ's finished work on Calvary than perhaps any other ministry in the 20th century. Although he spent many years as an evangelist, and then a pastor, he was known as the teacher of teachers. Over the air on his radio broadcasts, he was known as "the faith builder."
Every preacher and teacher has his mentors. For E.W. Kenyon, these were the leading evangelical preachers of his day: D.L. Moody, the American evangelist; Dr. A.J. Gordon, under whose ministry he rededicated his life to God; Dr. A.T. Pierson, one of the strongest voices for evangelism and an associate of D.L. Moody; and others of Moody's "warriors" such as R.A. Torrey, S.D. Gordon, A.B. Simpson, G. Campbell Morgan, Andrew Murry, F.B. Meyer. These were all household names in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Articles by many of these writers can be found in our Library.
Having a long and fruitful ministry for over 50 years, the Word of God was taught by this devoted man of God with unusual clarity, as deep and profound revelations of the Word were preached and taught in the Divine simplicity of the Gospel. His sermons were filled with incredible love, inspiration and Divine anointing, and were all geared towards increasing the faith of the hearers.
In the days when many holiness pioneers were teaching sanctification as a second work of grace, Kenyon boldly heralded the biblical truth of sanctification by the finished work of Jesus Christ alone. This won a decisive victory for God's people. Kenyon's ministry has inspired millions to believe God for healing, deliverance and salvation all upon the finished work which our Lord Jesus Christ accomplished for us on the cross!
E.W. Kenyon was a man of God who lived a devoted life to God above reproach. When faced with the seemingly impossible adversities of life, he conquered them all confidently, and victoriously by his simple faith in the Word of God. Kenyon's ministry needs no other vindication when we realize that his faith teachings have produced the exact same transformations in his converts. It is no small surprise that his ministry continues today, 50 years after his death, through his writings -- which are producing the same faith results in those who read his books! Kenyon's biblical teachings place us into the realm of a superman! John 14:12, "He that believeth upon Me, the works that I do, shall he do also" becomes a living reality!
Kenyon's life and ministry was so faith inspiring and uplifting that many ministries today emulate his life and faith teachings! The words and teachings of E.W. Kenyon are quoted by more ministers who teach faith and healing today than perhaps any other minister of the 20th Century! Some have suggested this is a negative thing, but this is a not a negative thing, but a positive one, because it clearly shows how one man of God has influenced an entire generation for God!
The Apostle Paul continually reminded his disciples to say just what he said, because what he said was Scriptural! E.W. Kenyon was used by God to lead men back to faith in the Word of God. Men of God such as F.F. Bosworth, who had a notable healing ministry throughout his life, continually referred to and applied E.W. Kenyon's teachings throughout his entire life. John G. Lake was also fond of E.W Kenyon's teachings.
The great healing revivalist T.L. Osborn considered E.W. Kenyon one of the greatest exponents and teachers on the subject of Divine Healing in his book "Healing The Sick." E.W. Kenyon influenced a generation for God!
In a day when very little real faith in the Word of God existed, E.W. Kenyon began teaching people how to have faith based upon the Integrity of the Word of God alone.
He taught and demonstrated to people of all walks of life, how to live by faith in the Word of God, based upon the sole foundation of the Authority of God's Word. He dominated and utterly mastered all circumstances supernaturally by his simple faith in God's Word. You can too! Kenyon's teachings will make your Bible a new Book!
If you have never read any of E.W. Kenyon's books, I strongly encourage you to order some of E.W. Kenyon's books [see below], for your faith will be strengthened, Jesus will become an absolute personal Reality to you, and you will truly learn what is is to walk by faith in God's Word! His books will teach you how to have your own faith life, how to be a master of circumstances, how to pray for sick folk and see instant results, and most of all, how to have a close and deep relationship with God through our Lord Jesus Christ!
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Books by Anne Rice

Monday, January 25, 2010





Who Is Ann Rice?


Biography

One of America's most read and celebrated authors, Anne Rice is known for weaving the visible and supernatural worlds together in epic stories that both entertain and challenge readers. Her books are rich tapestries of history, belief, philosophy, religion, and compelling characters that examine and extend our physical world beyond the limits we perceive.

Anne lives and works in California. Anne's life experiences and intellectual inquisitiveness provide her with constant inspiration for her work.

Anne Rice Fact File:


UPDATED MAY 11, 2008

1. Born Howard Allen O’Brien on October 4, 1941, Anne chose the name “Anne” when she entered the first grade at St. Alphonsus Grammar School. She attended Catholic schools until 1958 when her family moved from New Orleans to Richardson, Texas.

2. After graduating from Richardson High School, in 1959, Anne attended Texas Woman’s University in Denton, Texas and later North Texas State College.

3. After a year’s stay in San Francisco, during which she worked as an insurance claims examiner, Anne returned to Denton, Texas to marry Stan Rice, her childhood sweetheart.

4. Stan and Anne lived and worked in the San Francisco Bay Area from 1962 to 1988, experiencing the birth of Hippie Revolution first hand as they lived in the soon to be fabled Haight Ashbury. Both attended and graduated from San Francisco State University.

5. Stan Rice became a professor at San Francisco State shortly after receiving his M.A. there. He published many books of poetry, and later, after the couple’s return to New Orleans in 1989, painted over three hundred paintings in the attic of their Garden District home.

6. In 1972, Stan and Anne lost their daughter, Michele, to adult leukemia just before her fifth birthday.

7. Christopher Rice, born to them in 1978, seemed a gift from God in that both of his parents stopped their heavy drinking when faced with another chance at parenthood.

8. Anne wrote Interview with the Vampire while the couple still lived in Berkeley, California, just before Christopher’s birth, and has written over 28 novels.

9. Christopher Rice, who attended school in San Francisco, and later in New Orleans, has published four novels, all of which were New York Times bestsellers. Christopher attended Brown University for one year, and also attended New York University, before writing the first of his novels, A Density of Souls, which brought him national recognition. Please see the link to Christopher’s website.

10. In New Orleans in 1989, Stan and Anne bought the Garden District Greek Revival house that would become the setting for five or six of Anne’s novels. This house would also house Stan’s attic painting studio. It was here that Christopher wrote his first novel. This home was the fulfillment of a lifelong dream for Anne, who had passed the beautiful house frequently in her early years, going to and from her parish church of St. Alphonsus from her home on St. Charles Avenue. During the 1990’s, Anne owned many buildings in New Orleans, including St. Elizabeth’s Orphanage, her childhood home on St. Charles Avenue, and other restoration projects. The family enjoyed apartments in Florida and New York, and traveled frequently to Europe. Anne and Stan also traveled to Israel. Anne made a second visit in 2005. The 1990’s also saw Anne’s first novel, Interview with the Vampire made into a motion picture, starring Brad Pitt, Kirsten Dunst, and Tom Cruise. Anne’s screenplay was the basis for the adaptation, directed by Neil Jordan. Years later, Anne’s novel, The Feast of All Saints, about the free people of color of Lousiana, would be made into a Showtime mini-series, scripted by John Wilder. Please see the page devoted to the book and the series on this site. A Broadway musical, Lestat, was also developed in 2004 by Elton John, Bernie Taupin, Linda Woolverton and Rob Roth. Though the play closed, there are rumors of a New Orleans revival.

11. Anne returned to the Catholic Church in 1998, and in 2002 consecrated her writing entirely to Christ, vowing to write for Him or about Him. She remains passionately loyal to the readers of her earlier works. Please see the Essay on this site devoted to that subject.

12. Stan Rice died in 2002 within four and a half months of being diagnosed with brain cancer. His many beautiful paintings will soon find a permanent home in a southern museum. Eventually, his collected poems will be published. His extensive diaries are now being edited. They include many observations about his poetry and his painting. Please see the link to the Stan Rice website.

13. In 2005, after completing Christ the Lord, Out of Egypt, Anne left Louisiana and her beloved city of New Orleans to live in California. Within months of her departure, Hurricane Katrina devastated the area.

14. Christ the Lord, the Road to Cana, was published in 2008. A spiritual memoir by Anne entitled Called Out of Darkness will be published in the fall of 2008 as well.

15. Anne now lives and works in the California desert, a few hours drive from her son, Christopher, who lives and works in West Hollywood.



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Other Books by George Muller

Monday, January 25, 2010

George Muller on Faith (30-Day Devotional Treasuries) (Paperback)


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

George Muller: A Great Obtainer















George Muller: Curriculum Guide: The Bandit of Ashley Downs














Brief Account of the Life and Labors of George Muller














The Preaching Tours and Missionary Labours of George Muller














The World's Workers: George Muller and Andrew Reed (1885)













The Diary of George Muller















George Muller: Delighted in God/Translated to Chinese Language














Extracts from the Journal of George Muller














A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Mueller Written by Himself, Volumes I-IV (Paperback)














A Narrative of some of the Lord's Dealings with George Müller, Volume I (Paperback)
















A Narrative of some of the Lord's Dealings with George Müller, Volume II (Paperback)















A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Muller, First Part: Written by Himself (Paperback)















Narrative of some of the Lord's Dealings with George Muller Third Part (Hardcover)















A Narrative Of Some Of The Lord's Dealings With George Muller: Fourth Part (1856) (Hardcover)














A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George M? (Paperback)
















Biography - Muller, Robert George (1923-): An article from: Contemporary Authors [HTML] (Digital)


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


George Muller of Bristol and His Witness to a Prayer-Hearing God (Hardcover)


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The George Muller Foundation Annual Report 1990-91 (Paperback)


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
God Can Be Trusted [Large Print] (Paperback)



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Faith in God as to Temporal Things: An Account of the Rise and Progress of the New Orphan House (Paperback)















Brief Narrative of Facts Relative to the New Orphan Houses, on Ashley Down, Bristol, and Other Objects of the Scriptural Knowledge Institution (Paperback)


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Faith in Action










 
 
Who Is George Muller?


George Müller: Preacher and PhilanthropistGeorge Müller (1805-1898), preacher and philanthropist, born at Kroppenstadt near Halberstadt, [Prussia] on 27 Sept. 1805, was the son of a Prussian exciseman. Though a German by birth, he became a naturalised British subject, and for over sixty years was identified with philanthropic work in England. When four years of age his father received an appointment as collector in the excise at Heimersleben. When ten years of age he was sent to Halberstadt to the cathedral classical school to be prepared for the university. His mother died when he was fourteen, and a year later he left school to reside with his father at Schoenebeck, near Magdeburg, and to study with a tutor. After two and a half years at the gymnasium of Nordhausen he joined the university of Halle. Though he was intended for the ministry, Müller was a profligate youth, but at the end of 1825 a change came over his disposition, and he was thenceforth a man of self-abnegation, devoting himself exclusively to religious work.

For a brief period Müller gave instructions in German to three American professors, Charles Hodge of Princeton being one of them. In 1826 he resolved to dedicate himself to missionary work either in the East Indies or among the Jews in Poland. In June 1828 he was offered an appointment by the London Society for promoting Christianity among the Jews, and he arrived in London in March 1829 to study Hebrew and Chaldee and prepare for missionary service. But in 1830, finding that he could not accept some of the rules of the society, he left, and became pastor of a small congregation at Teignmouth, at a salary of 55£ a year. In the same year he married Mary Groves, sister of a dentist in Exeter, who had resigned his calling and 1,500£ a year to devote himself to mission work in Persia. Towards the close of the same year Müller was led to adopt the principle with which henceforth his name was associated, that trust in God, in the efficacy of sincere prayer, is sufficient for all purposes in temporal as well as in spiritual things. He accordingly abolished pew-rents, refused to take a fixed salary, or to appeal for contributions towards his support -- simply placing a box at the door of the church for freewill offerings -- and he resolved never to incur debt either for personal expenses or in religious work, and never to lay up money for the future.

After about two years in Teignmouth Müller went to Bristol, where he remained for the rest of his life. There he and others carried on a congregation, schools, a Scriptural Knowledge Institution, and other organisations, but the work among orphans was that by which he was chiefly known. The suggestion and the pattern of the Bristol orphanages were taken from the orphanages which Müller had visited in early life at Halle; these were erected in 1720 by a philanthropist named Francke, whose biography greatly influenced Müller. Beginning with the care of a few orphan children, Müller's work at Bristol gradually grew to immense proportions, latterly no fewer than two thousand orphan children being fed, clothed, educated, cared for, and trained for useful positions in five enormous houses which were erected on Ashley Down. These houses cost 115,000£, all of which, as well as the money needed for carrying on the work -- 26,000£ annually -- was voluntarily contributed, mainly as the result of the wide circulation of Muller's autobiographical 'Narrative of the Lord's Dealings with George Müller' (London, pt. i. 1837, pt. ii. 1841; 3rd edit. 1845) which was suggested to him by John Newton's 'Life.' This book conveyed to people in all parts of the world knowledge of Müller's work, his faith, and his experiences. As a consequence, gifts of money and goods flowed in without direct appeal.



In 1838 the biography of the great evangelist, George Whitfield, helped to intensify Müller's religious fervour, and, after he had passed his seventieth year, he set out on a world-wide mission, which, with brief intervals at home, covered seventeen years. He travelled over much of Britain and of the continent of Europe, made several journeys to America, and visited India, Australia, China, and other parts to preach the gospel.

In the course of his life Müller received from the pious and charitable no less than 1,500,000£; he educated and sent out into the world no fewer than 123,000 pupils; he circulated 275,000 Bibles in different languages, with nearly as many smaller portions of Scripture; and he aided missions to the extent of 255,000£. He supported 189 missionaries, and he employed 112 assistants. The record of his life seems to associate itself more closely with primitive and puritan periods of history than with modern times.

Müller was found dead in his room on the morning of 10 March 1898.

Müller was twice married. His first wife died in 1870. In 1871 he married Miss Susannah Grace Sangar, who accompanied him in his missionary tours; she died in 1895. From 1832 till his death in 1866 Henry Craig assisted Müller. In 1872 Mr. James Wright, who married Müller's only child, Lydia, became his assistant, and the work is still being carried on under Mr. Wright's superintendence.

[The Lord's Dealings with George Muller (London), 5 vols. 1885; Annual Reports of Scriptural Knowledge Institution; Memoir of George Müller, reprinted from the Bristol Mercury, 1898; Pierson's George Müller of Bristol, with introduction by James Wright, 1899.]



Copied by Stephen Ross for WholesomeWords.org from Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder, & Co., 1901. Suppl. 3.
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George Muller: Does Money Grow On Trees? (Little Lights) (Hardcover)

Monday, January 25, 2010
Who Is George Muller?

George Müller: Preacher and PhilanthropistGeorge Müller (1805-1898), preacher and philanthropist, born at Kroppenstadt near Halberstadt, [Prussia] on 27 Sept. 1805, was the son of a Prussian exciseman. Though a German by birth, he became a naturalised British subject, and for over sixty years was identified with philanthropic work in England. When four years of age his father received an appointment as collector in the excise at Heimersleben. When ten years of age he was sent to Halberstadt to the cathedral classical school to be prepared for the university. His mother died when he was fourteen, and a year later he left school to reside with his father at Schoenebeck, near Magdeburg, and to study with a tutor. After two and a half years at the gymnasium of Nordhausen he joined the university of Halle. Though he was intended for the ministry, Müller was a profligate youth, but at the end of 1825 a change came over his disposition, and he was thenceforth a man of self-abnegation, devoting himself exclusively to religious work.

For a brief period Müller gave instructions in German to three American professors, Charles Hodge of Princeton being one of them. In 1826 he resolved to dedicate himself to missionary work either in the East Indies or among the Jews in Poland. In June 1828 he was offered an appointment by the London Society for promoting Christianity among the Jews, and he arrived in London in March 1829 to study Hebrew and Chaldee and prepare for missionary service. But in 1830, finding that he could not accept some of the rules of the society, he left, and became pastor of a small congregation at Teignmouth, at a salary of 55£ a year. In the same year he married Mary Groves, sister of a dentist in Exeter, who had resigned his calling and 1,500£ a year to devote himself to mission work in Persia. Towards the close of the same year Müller was led to adopt the principle with which henceforth his name was associated, that trust in God, in the efficacy of sincere prayer, is sufficient for all purposes in temporal as well as in spiritual things. He accordingly abolished pew-rents, refused to take a fixed salary, or to appeal for contributions towards his support -- simply placing a box at the door of the church for freewill offerings -- and he resolved never to incur debt either for personal expenses or in religious work, and never to lay up money for the future.

After about two years in Teignmouth Müller went to Bristol, where he remained for the rest of his life. There he and others carried on a congregation, schools, a Scriptural Knowledge Institution, and other organisations, but the work among orphans was that by which he was chiefly known. The suggestion and the pattern of the Bristol orphanages were taken from the orphanages which Müller had visited in early life at Halle; these were erected in 1720 by a philanthropist named Francke, whose biography greatly influenced Müller. Beginning with the care of a few orphan children, Müller's work at Bristol gradually grew to immense proportions, latterly no fewer than two thousand orphan children being fed, clothed, educated, cared for, and trained for useful positions in five enormous houses which were erected on Ashley Down. These houses cost 115,000£, all of which, as well as the money needed for carrying on the work -- 26,000£ annually -- was voluntarily contributed, mainly as the result of the wide circulation of Muller's autobiographical 'Narrative of the Lord's Dealings with George Müller' (London, pt. i. 1837, pt. ii. 1841; 3rd edit. 1845) which was suggested to him by John Newton's 'Life.' This book conveyed to people in all parts of the world knowledge of Müller's work, his faith, and his experiences. As a consequence, gifts of money and goods flowed in without direct appeal.



In 1838 the biography of the great evangelist, George Whitfield, helped to intensify Müller's religious fervour, and, after he had passed his seventieth year, he set out on a world-wide mission, which, with brief intervals at home, covered seventeen years. He travelled over much of Britain and of the continent of Europe, made several journeys to America, and visited India, Australia, China, and other parts to preach the gospel.

In the course of his life Müller received from the pious and charitable no less than 1,500,000£; he educated and sent out into the world no fewer than 123,000 pupils; he circulated 275,000 Bibles in different languages, with nearly as many smaller portions of Scripture; and he aided missions to the extent of 255,000£. He supported 189 missionaries, and he employed 112 assistants. The record of his life seems to associate itself more closely with primitive and puritan periods of history than with modern times.

Müller was found dead in his room on the morning of 10 March 1898.

Müller was twice married. His first wife died in 1870. In 1871 he married Miss Susannah Grace Sangar, who accompanied him in his missionary tours; she died in 1895. From 1832 till his death in 1866 Henry Craig assisted Müller. In 1872 Mr. James Wright, who married Müller's only child, Lydia, became his assistant, and the work is still being carried on under Mr. Wright's superintendence.

[The Lord's Dealings with George Muller (London), 5 vols. 1885; Annual Reports of Scriptural Knowledge Institution; Memoir of George Müller, reprinted from the Bristol Mercury, 1898; Pierson's George Müller of Bristol, with introduction by James Wright, 1899.]



Copied by Stephen Ross for WholesomeWords.org from Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder, & Co., 1901. Suppl. 3.
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George Muller of Bristol and his witness to a prayer-hearing God; (Paperback)

Monday, January 25, 2010
Who Is George Muller?

George Müller: Preacher and PhilanthropistGeorge Müller (1805-1898), preacher and philanthropist, born at Kroppenstadt near Halberstadt, [Prussia] on 27 Sept. 1805, was the son of a Prussian exciseman. Though a German by birth, he became a naturalised British subject, and for over sixty years was identified with philanthropic work in England. When four years of age his father received an appointment as collector in the excise at Heimersleben. When ten years of age he was sent to Halberstadt to the cathedral classical school to be prepared for the university. His mother died when he was fourteen, and a year later he left school to reside with his father at Schoenebeck, near Magdeburg, and to study with a tutor. After two and a half years at the gymnasium of Nordhausen he joined the university of Halle. Though he was intended for the ministry, Müller was a profligate youth, but at the end of 1825 a change came over his disposition, and he was thenceforth a man of self-abnegation, devoting himself exclusively to religious work.

For a brief period Müller gave instructions in German to three American professors, Charles Hodge of Princeton being one of them. In 1826 he resolved to dedicate himself to missionary work either in the East Indies or among the Jews in Poland. In June 1828 he was offered an appointment by the London Society for promoting Christianity among the Jews, and he arrived in London in March 1829 to study Hebrew and Chaldee and prepare for missionary service. But in 1830, finding that he could not accept some of the rules of the society, he left, and became pastor of a small congregation at Teignmouth, at a salary of 55£ a year. In the same year he married Mary Groves, sister of a dentist in Exeter, who had resigned his calling and 1,500£ a year to devote himself to mission work in Persia. Towards the close of the same year Müller was led to adopt the principle with which henceforth his name was associated, that trust in God, in the efficacy of sincere prayer, is sufficient for all purposes in temporal as well as in spiritual things. He accordingly abolished pew-rents, refused to take a fixed salary, or to appeal for contributions towards his support -- simply placing a box at the door of the church for freewill offerings -- and he resolved never to incur debt either for personal expenses or in religious work, and never to lay up money for the future.

After about two years in Teignmouth Müller went to Bristol, where he remained for the rest of his life. There he and others carried on a congregation, schools, a Scriptural Knowledge Institution, and other organisations, but the work among orphans was that by which he was chiefly known. The suggestion and the pattern of the Bristol orphanages were taken from the orphanages which Müller had visited in early life at Halle; these were erected in 1720 by a philanthropist named Francke, whose biography greatly influenced Müller. Beginning with the care of a few orphan children, Müller's work at Bristol gradually grew to immense proportions, latterly no fewer than two thousand orphan children being fed, clothed, educated, cared for, and trained for useful positions in five enormous houses which were erected on Ashley Down. These houses cost 115,000£, all of which, as well as the money needed for carrying on the work -- 26,000£ annually -- was voluntarily contributed, mainly as the result of the wide circulation of Muller's autobiographical 'Narrative of the Lord's Dealings with George Müller' (London, pt. i. 1837, pt. ii. 1841; 3rd edit. 1845) which was suggested to him by John Newton's 'Life.' This book conveyed to people in all parts of the world knowledge of Müller's work, his faith, and his experiences. As a consequence, gifts of money and goods flowed in without direct appeal.



In 1838 the biography of the great evangelist, George Whitfield, helped to intensify Müller's religious fervour, and, after he had passed his seventieth year, he set out on a world-wide mission, which, with brief intervals at home, covered seventeen years. He travelled over much of Britain and of the continent of Europe, made several journeys to America, and visited India, Australia, China, and other parts to preach the gospel.

In the course of his life Müller received from the pious and charitable no less than 1,500,000£; he educated and sent out into the world no fewer than 123,000 pupils; he circulated 275,000 Bibles in different languages, with nearly as many smaller portions of Scripture; and he aided missions to the extent of 255,000£. He supported 189 missionaries, and he employed 112 assistants. The record of his life seems to associate itself more closely with primitive and puritan periods of history than with modern times.

Müller was found dead in his room on the morning of 10 March 1898.

Müller was twice married. His first wife died in 1870. In 1871 he married Miss Susannah Grace Sangar, who accompanied him in his missionary tours; she died in 1895. From 1832 till his death in 1866 Henry Craig assisted Müller. In 1872 Mr. James Wright, who married Müller's only child, Lydia, became his assistant, and the work is still being carried on under Mr. Wright's superintendence.

[The Lord's Dealings with George Muller (London), 5 vols. 1885; Annual Reports of Scriptural Knowledge Institution; Memoir of George Müller, reprinted from the Bristol Mercury, 1898; Pierson's George Müller of Bristol, with introduction by James Wright, 1899.]



Copied by Stephen Ross for WholesomeWords.org from Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder, & Co., 1901. Suppl. 3.


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George Muller-All Things Are Possible (Ambassador Classic Biographies) (Paperback)

Monday, January 25, 2010
Who Is George Muller?

George Müller: Preacher and PhilanthropistGeorge Müller (1805-1898), preacher and philanthropist, born at Kroppenstadt near Halberstadt, [Prussia] on 27 Sept. 1805, was the son of a Prussian exciseman. Though a German by birth, he became a naturalised British subject, and for over sixty years was identified with philanthropic work in England. When four years of age his father received an appointment as collector in the excise at Heimersleben. When ten years of age he was sent to Halberstadt to the cathedral classical school to be prepared for the university. His mother died when he was fourteen, and a year later he left school to reside with his father at Schoenebeck, near Magdeburg, and to study with a tutor. After two and a half years at the gymnasium of Nordhausen he joined the university of Halle. Though he was intended for the ministry, Müller was a profligate youth, but at the end of 1825 a change came over his disposition, and he was thenceforth a man of self-abnegation, devoting himself exclusively to religious work.

For a brief period Müller gave instructions in German to three American professors, Charles Hodge of Princeton being one of them. In 1826 he resolved to dedicate himself to missionary work either in the East Indies or among the Jews in Poland. In June 1828 he was offered an appointment by the London Society for promoting Christianity among the Jews, and he arrived in London in March 1829 to study Hebrew and Chaldee and prepare for missionary service. But in 1830, finding that he could not accept some of the rules of the society, he left, and became pastor of a small congregation at Teignmouth, at a salary of 55£ a year. In the same year he married Mary Groves, sister of a dentist in Exeter, who had resigned his calling and 1,500£ a year to devote himself to mission work in Persia. Towards the close of the same year Müller was led to adopt the principle with which henceforth his name was associated, that trust in God, in the efficacy of sincere prayer, is sufficient for all purposes in temporal as well as in spiritual things. He accordingly abolished pew-rents, refused to take a fixed salary, or to appeal for contributions towards his support -- simply placing a box at the door of the church for freewill offerings -- and he resolved never to incur debt either for personal expenses or in religious work, and never to lay up money for the future.

After about two years in Teignmouth Müller went to Bristol, where he remained for the rest of his life. There he and others carried on a congregation, schools, a Scriptural Knowledge Institution, and other organisations, but the work among orphans was that by which he was chiefly known. The suggestion and the pattern of the Bristol orphanages were taken from the orphanages which Müller had visited in early life at Halle; these were erected in 1720 by a philanthropist named Francke, whose biography greatly influenced Müller. Beginning with the care of a few orphan children, Müller's work at Bristol gradually grew to immense proportions, latterly no fewer than two thousand orphan children being fed, clothed, educated, cared for, and trained for useful positions in five enormous houses which were erected on Ashley Down. These houses cost 115,000£, all of which, as well as the money needed for carrying on the work -- 26,000£ annually -- was voluntarily contributed, mainly as the result of the wide circulation of Muller's autobiographical 'Narrative of the Lord's Dealings with George Müller' (London, pt. i. 1837, pt. ii. 1841; 3rd edit. 1845) which was suggested to him by John Newton's 'Life.' This book conveyed to people in all parts of the world knowledge of Müller's work, his faith, and his experiences. As a consequence, gifts of money and goods flowed in without direct appeal.



In 1838 the biography of the great evangelist, George Whitfield, helped to intensify Müller's religious fervour, and, after he had passed his seventieth year, he set out on a world-wide mission, which, with brief intervals at home, covered seventeen years. He travelled over much of Britain and of the continent of Europe, made several journeys to America, and visited India, Australia, China, and other parts to preach the gospel.

In the course of his life Müller received from the pious and charitable no less than 1,500,000£; he educated and sent out into the world no fewer than 123,000 pupils; he circulated 275,000 Bibles in different languages, with nearly as many smaller portions of Scripture; and he aided missions to the extent of 255,000£. He supported 189 missionaries, and he employed 112 assistants. The record of his life seems to associate itself more closely with primitive and puritan periods of history than with modern times.

Müller was found dead in his room on the morning of 10 March 1898.

Müller was twice married. His first wife died in 1870. In 1871 he married Miss Susannah Grace Sangar, who accompanied him in his missionary tours; she died in 1895. From 1832 till his death in 1866 Henry Craig assisted Müller. In 1872 Mr. James Wright, who married Müller's only child, Lydia, became his assistant, and the work is still being carried on under Mr. Wright's superintendence.

[The Lord's Dealings with George Muller (London), 5 vols. 1885; Annual Reports of Scriptural Knowledge Institution; Memoir of George Müller, reprinted from the Bristol Mercury, 1898; Pierson's George Müller of Bristol, with introduction by James Wright, 1899.]



Copied by Stephen Ross for WholesomeWords.org from Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder, & Co., 1901. Suppl. 3.


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